dbvictoria:

A truly unique work of fiction, ‘The Codex Seraphinianus‘ is a book that appears to be a visual encyclopedia of some unknown world or dimension. Written down in one of that worlds beautiful curving languages, the book by Italian artist, architect and industrial designer Luigi Serafini, explains the odd inhabitants and their colorful behaviors.

(x)

(via literaryartifacts)

trungles:

shorterexcerpts:

styro:

salon:

Ronald Reagan pretty much ruined everything for millennials.

fuckin’ ronnie

I try and bring up how he ruined free in state tuition in the name of hippie bashing when he was California’s governor often, but don’t exactly have the biggest platform.

"Worst of all, these students’ sense of the future is constrained by planning for and then paying down their student loans, often for decades. Economists are waking up to the fact that when young Americans enter the workforce burdened with over a trillion dollars in cumulative debt, they become risk averse, unwilling to move, less able to make major purchases, and slower to become homeowners. Not coincidentally, they don’t feel safe enough to register any major protests against the society that’s done this to them.”

Damn.

(via 99problemsandtheyreallbroadway)

scinerds:


Globe-Trotting Virus Hides Inside People’s Gut Bacteria

Every few months, we hear about a newly discovered that’s jumped from birds to people somewhere in the world. And the number of viruses identified in bats is “extraordinary and appears to increase almost daily,” scientists last year in the journal PLOS Pathogens.
But a virus that has been quietly hiding inside millions of people on three continents — and never noticed before? That doesn’t come along often.
Scientists at San Diego State University have discovered what may be the most common and abundant virus in the human gut. And yet, the tiny critter, called crAssphage (oh yes, there’s a story behind that name), has eluded researchers’ radar for decades.
Here’s the cool part: The virus doesn’t just hang out in our intestines naked and alone, scientists Thursday in the journal Nature Communications. Instead, the virus takes up residence inside gut bacteria — specifically inside Bacteroides, a group of microbes that have been linked to obesity and diabetes.
So the system is almost like a Russian nesting doll: The virus lives inside the bacterium, which lives inside our gut.
The new virus doesn’t make us sick, but it may be involved in controlling weight through its effect on Bacteroides. “We suspect this virus is very important in regulating the number of these bacteria [the Bacteroides] in the intestine,” says computational biologist , who led the study.
Edwards and his colleagues found the virus in fecal samples from people across the U.S., Europe, Korea and Japan. “But we think the virus is likely found worldwide,” he tells Goats and Soda. “We’ve basically found it in every population we’ve looked at. If we tested Africans, we think we’d find it in them, too.”
Scientists are just starting to learn about all the organisms that live in and on the human body. Collectively, they’re called the human . And there’s no question they’re important for our health.
So far, most studies have focused on the gut’s bacteria — not other microbes there. These bacteria are known to help regulate everything from our weight and immunity to heart health and . One study even found that changes in gut bacteria malnutrition in young children in Malawi.

scinerds:

Globe-Trotting Virus Hides Inside People’s Gut Bacteria

Every few months, we hear about a newly discovered that’s jumped from birds to people somewhere in the world. And the number of viruses identified in bats is “extraordinary and appears to increase almost daily,” scientists last year in the journal PLOS Pathogens.

But a virus that has been quietly hiding inside millions of people on three continents — and never noticed before? That doesn’t come along often.

Scientists at San Diego State University have discovered what may be the most common and abundant virus in the human gut. And yet, the tiny critter, called crAssphage (oh yes, there’s a story behind that name), has eluded researchers’ radar for decades.

Here’s the cool part: The virus doesn’t just hang out in our intestines naked and alone, scientists Thursday in the journal Nature Communications. Instead, the virus takes up residence inside gut bacteria — specifically inside Bacteroides, a group of microbes that have been linked to obesity and diabetes.

So the system is almost like a Russian nesting doll: The virus lives inside the bacterium, which lives inside our gut.

The new virus doesn’t make us sick, but it may be involved in controlling weight through its effect on Bacteroides. “We suspect this virus is very important in regulating the number of these bacteria [the Bacteroides] in the intestine,” says computational biologist , who led the study.

Edwards and his colleagues found the virus in fecal samples from people across the U.S., Europe, Korea and Japan. “But we think the virus is likely found worldwide,” he tells Goats and Soda. “We’ve basically found it in every population we’ve looked at. If we tested Africans, we think we’d find it in them, too.”

Scientists are just starting to learn about all the organisms that live in and on the human body. Collectively, they’re called the human . And there’s no question they’re important for our health.

So far, most studies have focused on the gut’s bacteria — not other microbes there. These bacteria are known to help regulate everything from our weight and immunity to heart health and . One study even found that changes in gut bacteria malnutrition in young children in Malawi.

everyone in the Broadway fandom: Andrew no

Andrew Lloyd Webber: Andrew yes